Column Opinion

Re: The Rule Of Law, Nigeria’s Only Hope For Survival

By Hassan Gimba

As we do from time to time, today is for the readers to respond and be heard. Thanks.

The Rule of Law, Nigeria’s only hope for survival, by Hassan Gimba:

Our greatest problem is that we have mistaken our secretarial studies for education.

Hon Bukar Shuwa

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You have said it all. I pray we all have ears to hear. The next and the last part of this topic seems to be the eye opener. We’ll be anxiously waiting. More ink to your pen Sir. 

Congratulations for being a voice to the voiceless.

Yusuf Lawan

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Well penned, as usual. The problem bedeviling and stunting the growth of Nigeria can be summed up as disregard for Rule of Law amongst its public and civil servants.

The only solution would’ve been robust law enforcement, since man is naturally selfish, nasty and brutal, based on Hobbesian philosophy. Unfortunately, the security/law enforcement sector of the country is faced with numerous flaws/challenges that hinder its effectiveness and efficiency in discharging their responsibility of order maintenance, safety and security amongst others.

The police and judiciary as the leading law enforcement agencies in the criminal justice system are accused of corruption, brutality and selective justice for decades that seemingly make them lose public trust and confidence. To the public, our contemporary police don’t yet reflect a democratic dispensation.

Dr Ukasha Ismail

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Great! Really Insightful.

Ahmed Garba Daya, Cfpm

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The stories are so wonderful and they have shown how organised our system was and how leaders were people one may look up to. But today, the irony of ironies is that leadership automatically places the leaders above the citizens in all ramifications. If we can still revive and replicate the concept of the ‘Rule of Law’, we will surely recover from many of our problems. Thank you sir!

Suleiman Haruna Saleh

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Hmmm! That is in time past. These were disciplined leaders who wished the country well, but nowadays… a very sorry state is what we’re witnessing. Some months back, a teacher disciplined a pupil for a bad conduct, the father of the child took the child back to the school, gave her a cane and asked her to flock the teacher and the media and human rights bodies rose in defence of the helpless teacher and with such attitude how can one expect a decent future?

Raymond Gukas

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Until those at the helm of our affairs, most of whom are lawmakers, do not see themselves far above the law, we will never get it right.

Yahaya Abdulrahman

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I enjoyed reading this amazing piece, indeed rule of law is the only hope for survival.

Hk Mohammad

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What went wrong?

Yakubu Sani Wudil

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God bless you sir. Waiting for the other episodes.

Muh D Kabir Mkb

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I only hope we will take heed. Thanks for the analytic piece.

Ibrahim Bomoi

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May Allah come to our rescue.

Anas Muhammad Sani

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Excellent piece that says it the way it is. One angle which contributes to the poor performance of our security personnel is the method of recruitment. It is an open secret that those being recruited into the system especially at the lower level are the kind of people who do not merit being security personnel. Nepotism and corruption play central roles in government recruitment exercises. So, how can we get good outputs from a system when we use poor inputs? Garbage in, garbage out! Poor welfare to the families of the security personnel who lost their lives in discharging their duties significantly contributes to low morale to confront armed criminals. Lackadaisical attitudes of officers in response to distress calls are another contributory factor to poor performance of our security personnel. I think the society is fully aware of the problems but who or what can galvanize us to swing into action is the national question. Let us answer it.

Professor Mohammed Khalid Othman

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What a balanced piece from the heart of a thoroughbred patriot. May your ink never dry, sir.

Suleiman Haruna Saleh

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It almost brings tears to my eyes…what a sad reality! May Allah continue to enrich you in wisdom and knowledge, sir.

Bashir Sulaiman

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Lack of leadership makes the whole system weak. No institution would thrive without effective leadership. On the other side, the masses have no hope, high cost of everything. The level of insecurity has reached an alarming phase. Violation of rule of law has become a norm in this country…more ink to your pen.

Mohammed Inga Jajere

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May Allah help us.

Adam Lawal Katsina

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What a piece, sir! Aptly inked, though too emotional.

Sani A. Garba

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They are indeed memories that cannot be forgotten. May Allah continue to protect us.

Esarh Muhammad G Fikeer

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May Allah almighty look into our situation and see us through.

Musa Abdullahi Umar

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More ink into your pen, sir. May Allah choose us best leaders that will carry out good leadership in this country.

Ahmad Ibrahim Tuje

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Very well said, sir, Nigeria has to revert to the rule of law and prayers for healing the country. 

Dauda Shehu

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Those who are supposed to protect lives and property of the masses are the real destroyers. Typical example is the Zaria massacre of December 2015.

Nazy H. Abdullahi

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Nice one here.

Attah Enwang

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Well spoken

Suleiman Abdullahi

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Banditry and our quest for leadership, by Hassan Gimba

Very apt. My only concern is when all this is over, how do you demobilize the armed youths, especially with the pervasive poverty in the land?

I believe we need to get people to clearly understand the difference between good and bad, and then come together for good, then advocate for justice and clear rule of law at all levels. Corruption at all levels needs to stop and through enlightenment. The revenue collector at the motor park and market gates, the policemen on the street, the tax collector, etc all need to be above board. When they understand and stop, then they may blow the whistle on the official ones and leaders. Nigerian elites need to have a frank talk and do a complete reorientation of the society.

Mohammed Aliyu

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For me as a Nigerian, I support the motion of #Defend yourselves, by the acquisition of firearms. There will be mutual respect & sanity. No bandits or terrorist will be strolling to communities and just be killing senselessly any longer.

Adegoke Alfred Sunday

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I think this is totally wrong to say a civilian should defend himself. It is just like you are bringing another criminal issue to our dear country.

Abdussamad Usman

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I think Masari makes sense. The only thing left for us now is to protect ourselves since the government cannot protect us.

Aliyu Kassem

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Northern region should emulate the southwest states that established AMOTEKUN. Since the formation of AMOTEKUN, the incidence of kidnapping and banditry has greatly reduced, people can now sleep with their two eyes closed.

Nuraeni Lawal

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If I were in the position of Aminu Bello Masari I would have resigned rather than tell people to defend themselves from bandits. Very frustrating. 

Musbahu Salisu Duba

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Interesting…the solutions sound so appropriate and suitable for the circumstances. May Allah bring an end to this insurgency.

Aisha Musa Auyo

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Some months ago I wrote a piece where I blasted the minister of defence for making such utterances. I had it in mind to write a piece in response to what governor Masari said but I’m unable to, especially because of my bereavement and I’m yet to settle.

Sir, it is very disappointing for political office holders to make such statements. How can someone who is heavily guarded tell the poor masses to go and defend themselves? They should strip themselves first of the security personnel guarding them and their families. Let them lead by example. Because they are political office holders, heavily protected and don’t feel the heat of what is going on, it’s easy for them to come out and say these things.

Secondly, allowing citizens to take up arms to defend themselves shows that the state is a complete failed one, the security agencies have no more use and there is a license to full blown anarchy.

Yes it may work in some areas but in some it may produce future security threats. I always use the Agatu incident as an example. As the government could not come to the rescue of Agatu, Agatu youths have to rise up and protect themselves and their people. For years they had continuous intensive engagements with killer herdsmen and today, you hardly hear of herdsmen attack in Agatu but what are the attendant consequences? The environment has become dangerous and fearful for the inhabitants because they are used to arms and the majority of households own arms.

Militarization of a society is one of the most dangerous things, Dr., sir. The best solution is for the government to rise up to its responsibilities, political office holders should not be heavily protected, I’m telling you sir, and insecurity will reduce.

Isaac Ochegbudu Akpachi

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By what I understood from your piece, I have come to the conclusion that self-defense is a solution to Nigerian insecurities.

Hamisu Mato

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This column is so interesting, sir, May Almighty Allah restore peace to our dear great nation.

Dauda Shehu

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How I wish we all heed to this call. But we may never do. Sad!  Thank you, sir, for proffering solutions to the problems bedeviling us.

Yahaya Abdulrahman

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